Friday, 12 March 2010

Allersheimer Landbier Dunkel

I was just searching through back posts, and it seems like I've tried quite a few landbiers at this stage. And I still can't say what makes a landbier a landbier, unless of course the label tells me so. I'll have to go through the list and pick out my favourites though and see if they have anything in common.

Speaking of which, Allersheimer Landbier Dunkel could end up on that list. It has an amazingly bready aroma (based on what I read in one German consumer test magazine, it seems that German testers don't necessarily see that as a good thing, but I do, if it feels right), kind of like rye bread with a nice, toasty, crispy crust. And the flavour? Yep! Definite toast, with butter. There's a suggestion of fruit, like strawberry jam, although maybe I was beginning to think of breakfast when I made the notes, though I hasten to point out that I did not have this as a pre-breakfast beer. It has a slight carbonic edge, and the finish is dry with a healthy, herb-like hoppiness. Yeah, not bad!

7 comments:

Bailey said...

I take it from context (and especially the pub Landbierparadies (sp?) in Nuremberg) that it's a term implying some kind of rustic authenticity -- like 'farmhouse bread', or 'real ale' for that matter. They're usually hazy, or dark, or in some other way distinct from those clear, clean yellow lagers. But that does seem to be about it. One brewery's landbier seems to be another's kellerbier...

Barry M said...

Yeah, that's a good way to think of it, and indeed, there's quite a range of flavours to be had. Buggers up the style-nazis, though that's not necessarily a bad thing :D

Barry M said...

Actually, the Hallerndorfer and Kapsreiter are quite pale and clear, as is Ebensfelder, which I somehow have not posted about, despite tasting it in late 2008 (or so Picasa tells me). Maybe these are the exceptions which prove the rule :D

Bailey said...

I bet the draught versions of those are hazy, though, and/or that the breweries are in wee villages.

There must be some bloody logic to it!

Please ask a German and let me know if they reveal the secret.

Anonymous said...

Have you been to Finkenkrug in Duisburg? 222 different kinds of beer, including about 20 on tap.

Barry M said...

No, I haven't, but then the only time I seem to be in Duisburg is when I'm changing trains on the way to Düsseldorf :) However, I think I've seen their website, or at least a colleague linked me to a bar in Duisburg with quite a range of beers! I'll have to plan for a longer stopover next time :)

Barry M said...

Yeah, that's the place. I was looking at their menu with interest. And it's close to the station, right?